Patricia Bramhall, Tydak CEO and Founder, is a widely-recognized expert in the field of IT Service Management, is ITIL certified (Information Technology Implementation Library), and is a sought-after public speaker whose most popular presentations include "How to Measure & Manage the Performance of Information Technology."

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07/30/2017

People, Process, Technology

In the days before Amazon was a household word (you know, before fire was invented), founder Jeff Bezos said he would spend hours each day on the site trying to “break it.”

He told an audience that he wanted to experience Amazon as a typical customer experiences it, so he spent hours shopping and would report to his tech staff what worked and what was broken.

Now that’s what a company leader does – focus on the customer experience. The people and processes that make that happen. Let the folks you hired worry about the inner workings of the technology.

As Jim Collins wrote in “Good to Great,” your job is to get the right people on the bus in the right seats. CEOs do not need to know every single detail when it comes to the technology that runs their companies.

Here are the questions CEOs ought to be asking themselves about technology:

- Are our systems up and running all the time?

- Is our data secure?

- Can our customers access and use our system easily?

- Does our technology add value to our company?

- How does our IT staff add value to our business and how can I support them?

- Does my IT manager take responsibility? Or does the IT director dodge questions with long technical answers?

Some questions CEOs do not need to be asking:

- How many servers do we have and what does each one do?

- What version of the operating system are we running?

- What is the software installed on each machine in our company?

I don’t think Jeff Bezos ever sat down to write repair code when he found a broken link in Amazon. He turned it over to someone whose job it was to make it work.